moonpeak

Moonpeak is an online and print magazine published in McLeodganj, Dharamshala, Himachal Pradesh, India. It features articles and interviews about travel, photography and books, with a focus on South Asia and Tibet. The magazine is based at Moonpeak cafe, restaurant and gallery on Temple Road, McLeodganj.
moonpeak has written 99 posts for moonpeak

Shanti Bloody Shanti

Ever wondered where they come from, the dreadlocked, tattooed, shirtless beardies who occupy the bottom echelon of backpacking in India, absorbing half-baked philosophy from any willing sadhu to have caught the scent of some rupees, roaring about on Enfield motorbikes from one trance party to the next? Ever wondered what becomes of them? If you’re … Continue reading

Favourite books on Tibet and Dharamshala

A huge number of books has been published on Tibet, ranging across travel memoir, history, biography, polemics and philosophy. Some, without doubt, are more readable than others. The following is very much a personal selection, favouring books that I have enjoyed because of their profundity, their clarity in telling a complex story, or the moving … Continue reading

Cracking open the world

“I felt so fortunate that this story fell into my lap. As a writer, how often does that happen?” says Thomas K. Shor. In Sikkim, Shor was introduced to an elderly Bhutanese woman whose story would, he was told, make him question his sense of reality. In 1962 she had left her land and everything … Continue reading

Hitting boundaries for six

Rahul Bhattacharya, Pundits from Pakistan: On Tour with India The Indian subcontinent thrives on cricket. You can tell that the cricketing season in India has started by the ubiquitous clusters of people outside shops where a television set is tuned to a live cricket match. For days every fan becomes a coach – an expert on winning strategies. But … Continue reading

Kakadu dreaming

Leaving the boat on idle, Mardediydiy did something none of the rest of us would dare: he leaned over the side and picked up one of his spears. Four of the fearsomely efficient implements, each tipped with an ironbark head, floated in the river. One by one, our guide lifted them out of the water … Continue reading

Eugene Atget at the AGNSW

Capturing the heart of a city In a magazine that usually focuses on South Asia, why review an exhibition of Eugène Atget’s photographs of Paris, showing at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, in Sydney? First, this is an outstanding exhibition, by a man who virtually invented a new category of photography. But there’s … Continue reading

Tibetans assert identity with cross-border protest

A movement that outsmarts Chinese authorities by promoting Tibetan culture has crossed the Himalayas and is gathering strength in India Many people visit Dharamshala to get an experience of Tibetan culture, which has been under severe strain since the Chinese occupation of Tibet in the 1950s. For decades, exiled Tibetans have gone to great lengths … Continue reading

Far stranger than fiction

John Zubrzycki, The Mysterious Mr Jacob Ask the name of the biggest diamond in the world, and most people would probably say the Koh-i-Noor, the 109-carat rock that adorns the crown of the British Queen Consort. Fought over for centuries by kings and emperors in India before passing into the hands of the British, it … Continue reading

High times in Tajikistan

Once a crossroads on the Silk Route, Tajikistan these days sits uneasily astride Afghanistan, China, and some other tricky neighbours. That doesn’t mean its people don’t know how to have a good time. “Vous parlez Français?” asked Abdurauf Razokov. Surprised, I mumbled a schoolboy “un peu” to the elegant, silver-haired archaeologist as he got into … Continue reading

Ladakh’s turquoise jewels

Once the preserve of the military, the lakes of eastern Ladakh are places of hallucinatory beauty. Just don’t expect a good night’s sleep. We’ve all seen it. Whenever Time magazine or one of its competitors brings out a story on the region and includes a map, a legion of unfortunate peons somewhere in the bowels … Continue reading